unused ephemera

4 articles tagged as unused ephemera

The above image is part of a collection of unused ephemera intended for use in Dolarhyde’s Ledger.  The unused ephemera were sold as part of the Prop Store’s Hannibal: The Complete Series Auction.


This image is a close-up of The Devil’s Fireplace.

From the Greater Manchester Museums Group:

The Devil’s Fireplace
1846

This sandstone fireplace is carved with figures of The Devil, a lawyer and a parson.  It is known as The Devil’s Fireplace and originally stood in The Abbey Inn, Oldham.

This fireplace was commissioned by the landlord of The Abbey Inn on West Street when it was rebuilt in 1846. The pub was fitted out with a medieval theme and originally contained several other carvings and stained glass windows. The fireplace came into Gallery Oldham’s collections in 1938 when Oldham Brewery modernised the building.

The carved figures of the Devil holding onto a lawyer and a parson are designed to illustrate the saying ‘The lawyer pleads for all, the parson prays for all, but the Devil takes all.’  In 1819 the Abbey Inn had been the site of a notorious inquest into the death at Peterloo of local man John Lees.  Perhaps the carving is a comment on this injustice or it may have been intended only to amuse. Whatever its origins this rather gruesome piece has long been a favourite item of Gallery Oldham’s collections.” [emphasis added]

The_Devil's_Fireplace


Find more unused ephemera here.

The above image is part of a collection of unused ephemera intended for use in Dolarhyde’s Ledger.  The unused ephemera were sold as part of the Prop Store’s Hannibal: The Complete Series Auction.


Eyes and women are a recurring theme for Francis Dolarhyde – in the book, in the TV program and in The Ledger.  Many of the women in The Ledger – and clearly, some that were chosen but not included – have had their eyes scratched out.  This example goes even further; the woman here has had her entire face scratched away with a sharp object.  The pre-Ledger version of the image was found on Wikimedia Commons.


Find more unused ephemera here.

The above image is part of a collection of unused ephemera intended for use in Dolarhyde’s Ledger.  The unused ephemera were sold as part of the Prop Store’s Hannibal: The Complete Series Auction.


Francisco Guerrero (aka “El Chalequero,” “The Mexican Bluebeard,” “The Consulada River Strangler/Ripper,” and/or “The Mexican Ripper”) was born in 1840 in the Bajio region of Mexico.  His childhood was marked by poverty, maternal abuse and paternal absence.

Guerrero raped, robbed and beheaded more than twenty women – primarily prostitutes – and attacked minors in the outskirts of Mexico City between the early 1880s and 1908.  He was also known to bite his sexual victims.

After his arrest in 1888 for the murder of two women, Guerrero was compared with Jack the Ripper: both targeted prostitutes approximately 40 years of age, both left gruesome wounds, both were blamed for previously unsolved crimes, and rumor had it that both were physicians or at least educated men.

At his 1890 trial, specialists were called upon to decide if he was criminally responsible.  They concluded that he was not mentally ill, but a “born criminal.”  Guerrero’s explanation of his behavior was that his victims had wounded his “self esteem as a man.”

After his release from prison in 1906, he robbed and beheaded an old woman.  Upon interrogation for that crime, he confessed: “Yes, I killed her.  I don’t know, sir… I don’t understand  what happens in me; but every woman inspires in me a terrible desire to commit a crime.”

Sources:

Francisco Guerrero


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Episode 3.08: The Great Red Dragon

Dolarhyde keeps a scrapbook of his and Hannibal Lecter’s crimes.  This lot includes 32 photo prints of various sizes depicting dragons, gargoyles, woodcarvings and the like, some of which are duplicates.  Several of the photos feature scratched-out eyes. – Hannibal: The Complete Series Auction, Lot #1053

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